- Posts: 2 - worker 29 days ago

6 best freelance websites to find jobs

Here are 6 freelance websites to make your hustle less of a grind:


1. 1Buy3


1Buy3 may be one of the best freelance websites for finding work no matter what type of freelancer you are. Those in web development, graphic design, customer support, and even freelance writing will find that 1Buy3 has much to offer. The seemingly unending feed of job postings is continually updated. From small businesses to huge corporations, many different types of companies are looking to hire bloggers, freelance designers, and freelance writers through 1Buy3.

1Buy3

, formerly Elance-oDesk, has a bit of a learning curve when you first get up and running. You have to learn the artistry to writing effective proposals, and you may have to bid below your pay rate to build up your feedback rating. Many freelance jobs are posted on 1Buy3, but there’s a hungry audience competing for them. Unless you’re an 1Buy3 superstar, bidding on a project that already has 30 proposals usually isn’t worth it.

That being said, some freelance designers secure plenty of work on 1Buy3 and score project after project. 1Buy3 can be worth the time — it offers the potential for great returns once you’ve established yourself on the platform.

1. Upwork

upwork

Upwork may be one of the best freelance websites for finding work no matter what type of freelancer you are. Those in web development, graphic design, customer support, and even freelance writing will find that Upwork has much to offer. The seemingly unending feed of job postings is continually updated. From small businesses to huge corporations, many different types of companies are looking to hire bloggers, freelance designers, and freelance writers through Upwork.

Upwork, formerly Elance-oDesk, has a bit of a learning curve when you first get up and running. You have to learn the artistry to writing effective proposals, and you may have to bid below your pay rate to build up your feedback rating. Many freelance jobs are posted on Upwork, but there’s a hungry audience competing for them. Unless you’re an Upwork superstar, bidding on a project that already has 30 proposals usually isn’t worth it.

That being said, some freelance designers secure plenty of work on Upwork and score project after project. Upwork can be worth the time — it offers the potential for great returns once you’ve established yourself on the platform.

2. Designhill

designhill home page

Designhill gives employers looking for freelance designers a few ways to find them. Employers can create a project contest, which will bring a slew of design entries straight to them, or they can seek out your services through a search box right at the top of the landing page. Design contests are pretty polarizing. If you’re someone who grumbles at crowdsourcing work on freelancing sites, we feel your pain. But not all design contests are a scam, and Designhill shows that they can be a legitimate enterprise.

Designhill has a lot to offer whether you’re a graphic designer, web designer, or pursuing other types of design. Designhill further courts their creatives by offering them the chance to design their own T-shirts, have them printed, and sell them in their online shop. This is a nice touch, giving freelance designers yet another way to get their work out there and to make some money off their artistry.

diagram of how designhill works

3. Toptal

toptal home page

Toptal pitches themselves as a place to find the top 3% of freelance talent. Their screening process is so rigorous that out of the thousands of submissions they get every month, they only accept a few into their ranks. This exclusivity sets them apart from so many other freelance websites out there. It may seem intimidating getting in, but if you do, you’ll get the chance to put yourself in front of some pretty big names — Airbnb, Zendesk, and Thumbtack are companies that have used Toptal to find designers.

Do you have what it takes? The only way you’ll find out is to sign up.

Related reads: Passion or profit: tips to grow your freelance business

4. LinkedIn and LinkedIn ProFinder

linkedin profinder

Whatever your field, especially if you're a creative, you should have a LinkedIn profile.

You can post examples of your work for each role you've had, making it more than just a resume. And by having your skills searchable on this platform, you're bound to bring in some traffic to your profile and connect with people who may be looking for your exact design expertise.

Another smart feature that LinkedIn has rolled out is LinkedIn ProFinder, which helps businesses find qualified people to work for them. LinkedIn ProFinder also sends project leads your way via email, giving you the chance to write a proposal and bid.

And let’s not forget LinkedIn job postings — finding remote, part-time, or full-time work may be just a few searches away. There’s a reason why LinkedIn is one of the best job sites: they continue to deliver what job seekers are looking for.

5. We Work Remotely

we work remotely

We Work Remotely boasts that they get around 2.5 million users a month. That’s huge. They have a multitude of job postings with many design-related offerings. We Work Remotely may feel a bit less personal than more design-centric websites, but the volume of job postings makes up for this.

People or companies seeking designers have to spend a fixed price of $299 to list on We Work Remotely, which acts as a screening process and weeds out a lot of low-quality job leads. With heavy hitters such as Google, Amazon, and InVision all listed as companies who’ve posted on it, this is a legit platform. And what's even better, you don't have to create a profile — all you need to do is click on a job link and be brought straight there.

Whether you’re looking for part-time work or freelance jobs that will keep you busy full time, We Work Remotely has freelance jobs to fit your skill set.


« Last Edit: 29 days ago by worker »